How to Protect Trees During Construction Work

The trees on your property add much value to it. Whether it is a commercial or residential site, shade trees are important not only because they contribute to the looks of the place, but also because they offer practical use. When near construction work occurs at a given site, the importance of preserving the trees…

The trees on your property add much value to it. Whether it is a commercial or residential site, shade trees are important not only because they contribute to the looks of the place, but also because they offer practical use.

When near construction work occurs at a given site, the importance of preserving the trees is even higher. As a matter of fact, homes are often constructed near trees due to their environmental and aesthetic value. It is construction work that causes the most damage to a tree. To avoid both long and short-term tree damage, you need to consult with arboricultural consultants and every other party involved in the project. Here is what you should be mindful of:

Protection of existing trees – heavy machinery and construction work within proximate of trees can cause irreparable damage. According to arborists, fixing tree damage is considered far more expensive than preventing it. For this reason, establish visible and durable barricades that keep trees protected. Young trees of 1 to four years require minimum protection of 30 cm area for each 2.5 cm of trunk diameter. For mature trees, the protected area should span two meters from the widest measure of their crown.

Protection of root systems – trees contain two types of roots: large and small absorbing roots. The large system expands in a horizontal direction and is 15-60 cm in depth. They serve to provide anchorage and nutrient transport. The smaller roots average 0.16 cm in diameter and serve to absorb nutrients and water. Damaging any of the two systems can have a significant impact on tree's health.

Soil compaction – once a tree is established, any soil changing activity can prove detrimental to its health. With construction traffic near the tree, soil can become severely compacted, thus reducing permeability. Compacted soil significantly restricts root growth and contributions to less water and nutrients. A layer of 10-15 cm mulch of wood chips can reduce compact.

Soil fills – adding an excessive amount of soil around a tree interferees with proper moisture and air circulation. With soil fills, roots can be exposed to improper gas exchange and build up carbon dioxide. The only soil fills that are harmless to trees are those with topsoil less than 8cm. Excessive fill symptoms include small leaves and premature autumn discolouration.

Direct physical injury – construction equipment can damage the bark in what is known as 'skinning' process. A tree can not possibly survive without its bark, making that sort of damage particularly problematic. Trenching can also physically damage a tree's roots. Boring a tunnel under the roots is the best way to save them. If trenching is not avoidable, it should be placed as far back from the trunk as possible.

It is wise to consider a tree survey before and after construction work takes place on your property. That is the best way to ensure trees are in good shape or what measures should be taken to minimize damage.