The Main Conservatory Styles

A conservatory is possibly the most versatile living space in your home. It's ideal as a dining room, for studying, as a playroom, or just for enjoying the garden all year round. The right style of conservatory will also add value to your home. But getting the right style is important, together with the right…

A conservatory is possibly the most versatile living space in your home. It's ideal as a dining room, for studying, as a playroom, or just for enjoying the garden all year round.

The right style of conservatory will also add value to your home. But getting the right style is important, together with the right range of options. With just a little planning, you can enjoy the right conservatory for your own home and needs.

One of the most popular of the main conservatory styles is the Victorian. It has a bay front that provides a rounded effect. This, coupled with the ridged roof, makes the Victorian conservatory a good choice for almost any style of house.

The Victorian conservatory usually comes with three facets. However, for a more rounded look, five facets or more are available. If you're stuck for space yet still want the rounded appearance, you can opt for a larger front facet and smaller side facets to maximize the floor space.

Another of the main conservatory styles is the Edwardian. It comes with a flat front and provides great use of floor space because of its square or rectangular look. The Edwardian conservatory has a ridged roof, which adds to the sense of space. The roof sides slope back to the center, providing a contemporary style that fits most properties.

For similar floor space, you could also try a Georgian conservatory. The main difference from the Edwardian is the ridge, which goes all the way to the front of the conservatory, adding to the feeling of height and space.

You can use the front section above the frames to individualize your conservatory, sometimes by lining up the mullions or with a sunburst design.

For anyone wanting a larger conservatory, the P-shape conservatory is a good choice. The shape is often achieved by combining a Victorian, Edwardian or Georgian with a lean-to. The resulting conservatory can be used as two different living areas, like a dining area and an office.

For a very large and imposing style of conservatory, you should look at the T-shape. It has a versatile floor space that's good for many uses. There's a central projection that might be Edwardian, Victorian or Georgian. You'll need a larger property because of the proportions needed for a T-shape.

For those on a smaller budget requiring just a little extra space or a sun room, a traditional or lean-to conservatory can offer great value.

Ultimately, which style of conservatory you plump for will come down to personal taste, what you need it for and the style of your home.